Do I Need Two Phases of Braces? An Expert's Perspective

When considering whether or not two phases of braces are necessary for you or your child's dental health needs, it is important to consult with an experienced orthodontist who can assess your individual case.

Do I Need Two Phases of Braces? An Expert's Perspective

When it comes to orthodontic treatment, the decision of whether or not to have two phases of braces can be a difficult one. Depending on the problem with the child's teeth or bite, an orthodontist may recommend two-phase orthodontic treatment. This is because addressing problems in two different phases can prevent a child from needing more invasive treatment in the future. The goal of the second phase of treatment is to make sure that the teeth are in their proper places so that they work well, have a healthy bite, and have a pleasant appearance.

Early treatment can improve your child's self-esteem. Perhaps the most important reason for interceptive treatment at age seven or eight is the psychological benefit it provides to our young patients. Even if it's possible to get a similar result at age 13, it's difficult to erase the scars of four or five years of teasing and embarrassment that often accompany fangs or exaggerated bites. Our young people already have enough self-esteem problems without having to worry about their teeth.

Early orthodontic correction of orthodontic problems can not only reduce jokes and insults, but it can also turn responsibility into an advantage. Two-phase orthodontic treatment can give children a beautiful smile that improves self-esteem and often changes the way they approach the world.An orthodontist may recommend phase 2 to correct complex problems, such as teeth that haven't come out, too many or too few teeth, or correcting a bite. While baby teeth may move during the first phase of orthodontic treatment, their movement is part of the process to ensure enough space for permanent teeth. Aaron Goodall, director of business intelligence at Ormco and formerly director of Clinical Affairs, agrees that choosing two-phase treatments instead of just one depends on the particular case being treated.

If an appliance is used in the first phase of care, it could be a form of braces or other fixed appliance, or it could be a removable appliance.Phase 1 treatment corrects existing or developing orofacial, skeletal, or muscular environments before the arrival of all of the patient's permanent teeth. Jeff Summers, an orthodontist who has been practicing since 2003 in a private practice in Greenville, South Carolina, said parents always ask him why there are two phases of treatment now, compared to the one they remember when they were children. Phase 2 isn't necessary for everyone, so you'll want to have an in-depth conversation with your orthodontist about your particular case.Goodall explains that a typical objective of phase 1 is to intercede from the beginning to allow for more efficient phase 2 treatment. Phase 2 orthodontic treatment offers permanent solutions to improve the function and stability of the bite, jaw and mouth.

The ultimate goal of phase 2 orthodontic treatment is to ensure that you have a healthy and beautiful smile for life.Jorgensen's 25 years of specialized practice and his nearly 10,000 completed cases make him an expert in biphasic treatments, extraction and non-extraction therapies, functional orthodontics, transparent aligners (Invisalign) and multiple support systems (including conventional orthodontic appliances, Damon and other self-ligating braces, Suresmile and lingual braces). Whether an orthodontist recommends phase 2 treatment for you or your child, the ultimate goal is to increase your confidence with a healthy smile.Most studies don't consider the soft tissue or psychology of young patients. Most of the studies cited by those who are not in favor of two-phase treatment suggest that the same orthodontic results can be achieved, whether problems are addressed in a single phase or in several phases. He believes that only a few specific cases require two phases and that, for the rest, two-phase orthodontic treatment plans tend to take longer and cost more.When considering whether or not two phases of braces are necessary for you or your child's dental health needs, it is important to consult with an experienced orthodontist who can assess your individual case and provide you with personalized advice.

Ultimately, two-phase orthodontic treatment can provide long-term benefits for both physical health and psychological well-being.

Esther Koloc
Esther Koloc

Typical foodaholic. Total internetaholic. Typical bacon maven. Wannabe web ninja. Infuriatingly humble social media specialist.

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